Plesk vs cPanel – two hosting control panels compared

Plesk vs cPanel - Battle of the hosting control panels

When it comes to web hosting control panels, Plesk vs cPanel comparison is something you may think about. Apart of DirectAdmin, ISPConfig and Webmin, both cPanel and Plesk has long history on the market of server management tools.

About Plesk and cPanel

Plesk has helped system administrators for over 10 years. Because of its user-friendly interface and wide set of features, admins can manage their servers more efficiently. The latest Plesk is available in Windows and Linux and is designed to work unobtrusively, manage performance and gatekeep in the shadows.

 

Plesk Onyx

cPanel first appeared in 1996. As its a pioneer in this market, cPanel still has a dedicated fanbase for its obsolete products. Even though its current offering is called cPanel 68. Newer iterations of this popular solution are a kind of welding together of cPanel. This facilitates customer account management and Web Host Manager (WHM) which tackles server administration.

 

cPanel

Plesk vs cPanel – Usability

CLI (command line interface) is an option for each of these interfaces. But most users will no doubt want to unlock their goodies via the GUI (graphical user interface).

Most users favour Plesk over cPanel for its tidier GUI, which makes it simpler to understand and more intuitive to use. Its approach is to group tools on the left of the screen – as that’s the side people start reading from. And you can find more options buried under each tool.

cPanel’s approach comes from the ‘garden shed’ approach to GUI design. Because the designers seem to have just thrown everything in there and shut the door. The redeeming feature that helps it claw back some points in the Plesk vs cPanel contest is that you can modify the interface to suit your own preferences.

Security – Plesk or cPanel?

Both solutions boast a variety of features designed to make servers bulletproof. Or at least, safe from incursions by nefarious bots and their human handlers.

But Plesk offers features such as fail2ban – which prevents intrusions, active directory integration, and spam defence for email. Meanwhile, cPanel offers automatic installation of SSL certificates, directories with password protection and IP address denials.

Best Features – cPanel or cPanel alternative, Plesk

So, Plesk or cPanel in terms of variety of features? Plesk and cPanel give clients identical features to manage accounts and servers. Users can configure DNS settings ( read about name servers setup ), manage email accounts and databases. And they also get FTP (File Transfer Protocol) facilities. The cPanel experience can be bolstered with extra apps. But Plesk hits the ground running with straight-out-of-the-box access to more helpful apps and extensions.

Plesk, as cPanel alternative, supports Docker for Linux, putting the 200,000 image Docker catalogue at their users’ fingertips through the web hosting control panel. And Gitman extension makes Git use a feature too. In contrast, cPanel users can only enjoy the same experience via complicated workarounds. Which may not really be ideal.

Plesk vs cPanel: Distros

As we said before, Plesk runs on both Linux and Windows Server, while cPanel is a Linux-only deal. True, you can achieve Windows-server-compatibility, but only via certain tweaking and fiddling.

CentOS, CloudLinux and RedHat Enterprise Linux are the only OS incarnations supported by cPanel. In contrast, Plesk works with 14 Linux distros that include Debian, CentOS, and Ubuntu. This in addition to being compatible with Windows servers.

Solutions Plesk Onyx cPanel/WHM
OS compatibility Both Linux and Windows operating systems are supported.
  • Windows family: Windows Server 2008 R2, Windows Server 2012 R2, Windows Server 2012)
  • Linux family: Debian, CentOS, Ubuntu, Cloudlinux 6-7, Virtuozzo, Red Hat Enterprise 6-7
cPanel is Linux control panel. Supported distributives: CentOS, Cloud Linux, Red Hat Enterprise Linux.
Web servers Apache, NGINX with caching Apache with Nginx caching
Administration Unified authorization procedure for users and administrators. cPanel basically consists of cPanel and WHM – WHM is accessible only for server-related administrational tasks. cPanel access gives control only over website.
Interface Modern UX/UI based on React.Js. Built-in ready to code environment with support of Javascript, PHP, Perl, Ruby On Rails, Python, Java and .NET. User-friendly interface with full control over majority of cPanel/WHM features. Availability of command line and API-based access as the way to automate administrational tasks.
Security A lot of security features are provided from the box e.g. Plesk Firewall, Revisium Antivirus, Fail2ban AutoSSL, cPHulk, built-in support of CSF/LFD and some other useful features
WordPress support WordPress Toolkit provides full list of automation & management features vital for the scalable WordPress infrastructure support. cPanel’s WordPress Manager is far away from perfection.
Extensions/Add-ons Plesk comes with ecosystem of various extensions, covering all possible needs of any server administrator. Among these extensions are Security Advisor, WordPress Toolkit, Joomla! Toolkit, Let’s Encrypt SSL support, SEO Toolkit etc. Extra apps are available via auto-installers.
DBMS MySQL / MariaDB / MSSQL Server databases can be managed via web browser. MySQL/MariaDB databases management via web interface
SSL Let’s Encrypt + Symantec AutoSSL with Let’s Encrypt
Mobile accessibility
Backups Ready to use solutions based on Dropbox, Acronis, Google Drive Compatibility issues can be spotted between various cPanel backup versions.
Technologies Support of Docker, Git, Node.js, WordPress Toolkit Docker, Node.Js & Git can be still supported by cPanel, however workaround here is sophisticated

Plesk vs cPanel – what’s your decision?

After reading this far, it’s obvious that your ideal web hosting control panel will be largely dictated by your server’s OS. But as a human who has to use an interface every day, you want to choose the one that makes your life easier. With 100+ extensions and a more intuitive interface, Plesk seems like the current winner. Though both solutions are feature-rich, the Plesk vs cPanel face-off must be won by the new kid on the block.

My Plesk User Experience (2): Lessons learned from testing Plesk Onyx

My Plesk user experience 2 - Plesk Onyx testing and analysis

So Plesk Onyx came along and it had implemented NGINX caching. Naturally I was curious and removed all my customizations. Then I started to compare the website performance with the inbuilt NGINX caching, other caching methods, and the Speed Kit extension that speeds up websites.

This was the variety of tests and configurations I made on the platform:

Platform Web Server Configuration Caching Engine Configuration
1 WordPress Website on Plesk Onyx 17.8.11 Proxy Mode and Smart static files processing turned ON NGINX Caching OFF
2 WordPress Website on Plesk Onyx 17.8.11 Proxy Mode and Smart static files processing turned ON NGINX Caching ON
3 WordPress Website on Plesk Onyx 17.8.11 Proxy Mode and Smart static files processing turned ON NGINX Caching OFF Redis Caching ON
4 WordPress Website on Plesk Onyx 17.8.11 Proxy Mode and Smart static files processing turned ON NGINX Caching ON Redis Caching ON
5 WordPress Website on Plesk Onyx 17.8.11 Proxy Mode and Smart static files processing turned ON NGINX Caching OFF SpeedKit Ext. ON
6 WordPress Website on WordPress.com Everything in default mode
7 WordPress Website on Vesta CP NGINX Web Template turned ON with the WordPress2 Option selected

I installed the Plesk server (version 17.8.11 update 25) on the Digital Ocean droplet on CentOS7 with 2 GB RAM. Next, installing the Redis server as it was. I plugged in Redis Object Cache with its default settings. And had no additional parameters in additional NGINX directives.

There was PHP version 7.2.10 with default settings and the “FPM application served by NGINX mode. And the VestaCP server installed on Digital Ocean droplet on Ubuntu 16.04.

As a test page, I used a typical blog post with lots of photos. Hosted both on the server and externally, with a small chunk of text and one comment.

Testing on the Plesk Onyx Platform

Testing on Plesk Onyx platform

For testing, I used the httperf command line tool (with the same launch parameters) and a well-known online testing system GTmetrix.com. From the GTmetrix.com reports, I chose the following parameters:

Time to First Byte (TTFB) is the total amount of time spent to receive the first byte of the response once it has been requested. It is the sum of “Redirect duration” + “Connection duration” + “Backend duration“. This metric is one of the key indicators of web performance.

Once the connection is complete and the request is made, the server needs to generate a response for the page. The time it takes to generate the response is known as the Backend duration.

    • Fully Loaded Time: RUM Speed Index is a page load performance metric indicating how fast the page fully appears. The lower the score, the better.
    • PageSpeed Score
    • YSlow Score

The httperf utility was launched with the following parameters:

httperf –hog –server jam.pavuk.su –uri=/index.php/2018/10/03/kgd/ –port=443 –wsess=100000,5,2 — rate 1000 –timeout 5

The creation of 100,000 sessions (5 calls each 2 seconds) with speed 1,000. And here, the following markers received with httperf were the most interesting:

  • Connection rate – the real speed of creating new connections. It showed the server ability to process connections.
  • Request rate – the speed of processing requests, in other words a number of requests a server can execute per second. It showed web app responsiveness.
  • Reply rate – an average number of server replies per second.

Plesk Onyx Test Results

Plesk test results

Clearly, there’s an ocean of tools and solutions to test website performance. Some more complete and respected than others. But even the tools I used allowed me to come to pretty objective conclusions. The test results are summarized in the table below with the green buts highlighting the best values of the parameter, and the red – the worst.

Plesk Onyx test results table

And so, after analyzing the received data, we can conclude the following:

  1. Unchanged PageSpeed and YSlow Scores
    PageSpeed and YSlow Score metrics in Plesk remain absolutely the same, no matter the configuration. Therefore, they don’t depend on caching or other server settings like for code optimization, image size, gzip compression and CDN usage.
  2. Caching is essential for speed
    No caching on Plesk at all gives the worst time metrics. Fully Loaded Time and TTFB dramatically increase. Websites with the turned off caching are significantly slower.
  3. NGINX and Redis are a successful combo
    Comparing caching methods, NGINX caching used in Plesk seems better than Redis Cache. It’s possible the default Redis Cache configuration doesn’t let us achieve a higher performance. It’s not quite clear how the used combination of both caching tools works, but it gives quite alright TTFB и Backend duration metrics.
  4. WordPress performance suffers
    WordPress.com shows the worst performance results. However, by default, it doesn’t actually offer bad optimization for the PageSpeed Score.
  5. Vesta and NGINX mean extremely fast page load
    Using the lightweight Vesta control panel with the turned on NGINX Web Template + php-fpm (wordpress2) designed for WordPress hosting gives great speed results. Even more, for WordPress hosting, VestaCP has custom NGINX web templates including NGINX caching support.

Moving to a new DigitalOcean Droplet

Plesk on Digital Ocean droplet - install - now a one-click app

I deployed Plesk to the new DigitalOcean droplet using Web Installer as it doesn’t require me to go to the server via SSH and do all the stuff in web interface. This recent migration from my VPS to a new DigitalOcean droplet gave me new data for my last Plesk experience. All in all, the migration was successful with minor warnings, which in most cases I resolved using migration wizard suggestions.. The bottom line is that Plesk with turned on key features and settings gives very good results for your website.

Also, I strongly recommend you turn on NGINX caching with your Plesk if you’re seeking a simple and reliable way to speed up your website. You won’t need to set up any difficult configurations. And web pros can make the most of Plesk by fine-tuning as they see fit. That’s what it’s made for. their right.

Finally, my story was aimed at people without professional knowledge who simply want to use built-in Plesk features. So I hope that this story will be good reason for you to login to Plesk and take a fresh look.

My Plesk User Experience (1): Easy Starts and Common Issues

Plesk User Experience While Testing Plesk Onyx

Plesk first crossed my path when it came packaged with web hosting acquired from a Russian provider. At the time it was version 12.0, but I never paid any attention to it until I discovered that part of its service was domain names registration.

Starting Off with Plesk

It couldn’t hurt to register a couple of domains for myself, and so I did. I added them to Plesk, and configured the DNS records. Now these websites loaded default web pages. Then, as I already had websites hosted in Plesk, I thought “Why not use mailboxes registered on my own domains?”. So I went and created a couple of mailboxes and configured Roundcube webmail.

But it was all just personal use until I occasionally started to use this complete infrastructure as a sort of a test server. Why? In order to solve tasks related with questions from forum users. And so, my Plesk server operated like this for a while without any use cases development. That is, until the start of 2017 – when I spontaneously took a closer look at something I had available, but which was laying there unused this whole time.

Easy Building on the Plesk Platform

Building on Plesk Platform

I realized that I could now use my own platform for my personal blog. It didn’t take me long to choose WordPress as I had previous experience with it. What’s more, the new Plesk Onyx had integrated its WordPress Toolkit, which looked promising. After getting a license with additional extensions, I started building – themes, plugins, you name it, before publishing my first posts.

Plesk is also built for multiple domains. So when my famous, American Instagrammer friend needed a website to develop her “Travelling with kids” idea, I offered my hosting platform.

Within Plesk, I created a personal account for her and subscriptions with two domains. One was used to host her website, and the other to host her personal mail.

She quickly learned how to use the WordPress admin dashboard and Plesk. She created mailboxes and installed WordPress plugins and themes. Then created posts and moderated comments. Which I believe says a lot about how easy Plesk’s interface is.

As thousands of subscribers were actively visiting both our blogs, it was time to pay more attention to Plesk server maintenance. And later, to server optimization, creating regular work in the Plesk interface and even more in the Linux command line. But more on that later. Before that, there were common issues of all sorts that I had started to face.

Issues uncovered and solved by using Plesk

Issues solved by using Plesk
  • Service downtime
    Various services like httpd and MySQL stopped every now and then. I managed to solve this by turning on and configuring Watchdog.
  • Memory usage
    Then Health Monitor started to constantly notify that MySQL consumes RAM.
  • Basic MySQL settings
    I had optimized operation modes of MySQL via CLI and thought it would benefit to have at least some basic settings of MySQL optimization in the Plesk interface. Eventually, RAM for VPS was increased from 1 to 2 GB, solving the issue.
  • Frequent updates
    Email notifications about new WordPress plugins made me login to Plesk often. I am one of “update-it-all” types and very meticulous when it comes to installing the latest software versions. The Smart Updates feature in WordPress Toolkit solved this task.
  • Extensions accessibility
    I used to find accessing my installed extensions inconvenient. So it was great when WordPress Toolkit had installed extension icons in the left menu.

Speeding up and hardening the WordPress Website

Speed Up WordPress Website

During an internal contest for the best WordPress website hosted in Plesk, I focused on two goals. I wanted to make my WordPress website the fastest and the most secured.

To achieve the A+ note on ssllabs.com, special NGINX parameters became necessary. They were installed via Additional nginx directives and the /etc/nginx/conf.d /ssl.conf file. An attempt to maximize the speed of my website powered by NGINX was a special matter.

At that time, NGINX caching wasn’t yet implemented in Plesk. So I tried various caching solutions, such as redis, memcached, and the very same NGINX caching. All via the CLI, of course, but with the help of customized settings.

It didn’t take long to realize the NGINX version shipped with Plesk was not suitable to use with trendy acceleration technologies. Ones like caching, the brotli compression method, PageSpeed Module, or TLS1.3. Even the Plesk Forum also raised this issue as it seemed to occupy the minds of advanced users.

The result was publishing different ways how to compile the latest NGINX versions. Thus, supporting modern technologies, and substituting the NGINX version shipped with Plesk for a custom one. I also joined forum users in compiling and optimizing NGINX builds for my Plesk server, all during the contest.

In the end, I got the speedy WordPress site I wanted powered by customized NGINX with Redis caching. All was well until Plesk Onyx was released. See what happened next in part 2 of my Plesk experience story tomorrow.

What can go wrong without the best web hosting platform? [Infographic]

Without the right host for your website, a lot can go wrong for your business. Read on to learn more about the importance of choosing the right web hosting platform.

How important is choosing the right web host

Web Hosting Platform - infographic by Plesk

Choosing the right web hosting platform is as important as your site content. And the wrong web hosting platform can seriously impact your business. Your web host must protect your site from security breaches, and backup all your data in case of hacking.

Slow websites or ones that go down for even a few minutes will negatively impact your SEO ranking. (In this event, see how to turbocharge your website speed to get back on track.)

So how important is choosing the right web host? Let’s look at the facts.

One-second page load delay leads to 7% conversion drop

Load delay and conversion drop

Page loading time is one of the most important factors that contribute to your website’s success. Also, it affects whether visitors will return to your website and perform profitable or desired actions. According to Aberdeen Group, a 1-second loading delay can result in a 7% decrease in e-commerce conversions and can drop customer satisfaction by 16%.

Sites on Google’s page 1 load in under 2,000 ms

Sites on Google’s page 1 load in under 2,000 ms - Plesk

Websites that appear on Google’s first page of search results load in under 2,000 milliseconds and loading delays can result in a loss of 44.19% in page views for a 20 second loading delay. A slow-loading website isn’t likely to appear in the first page of Google’s results.

Need a mighty page speed boost? Check out Google Pagespeed Insights.

Almost half of websites are hosted on Apache servers

Apache servers - a majority

From all the billions of websites that exist on the internet, Apache servers are the most widely used with 46.9% of existing websites. NGINX is the second most popular with 37.8% of websites hosted on it. So, make sure your hosting platform supports this.

Stats for SMBs and large companies using private cloud

Stats for SMEs and large companies using private cloud - Plesk

Private cloud computing generally feels safer than public cloud computing because access to the resources in a cloud infrastructure is limited. However, many SMEs – about 8%, and even 24% of larger companies do not buy cloud infrastructure altogether. This is mainly because of lack of knowledge about cloud computing. Pick a web host with plenty of opportunities to scale to the cloud.

A whopping 86% of websites have serious security flaws

Whopping 86% of websites have serious security flaws - Plesk

Over 30,000 websites are hacked daily with 86% of websites having at least one serious security flaw, including these top brands.

Over half of WordPress sites run on an outdated CMS version

Over half of WordPress sites have outdated CMS version

One of the reasons why so many websites are hacked is because many of them run on an outdated CMS version. In fact, 56% of hacked WordPress sites, 84% of hacked Joomla sites, 96% of Magento sites and 81% of hacked Drupal were all hacked for the same reason.

Why Choose Plesk web hosting platform?

When it comes to choosing a web hosting platform, look for reliability and security more than anything. Want to offer users the ability to scale and grow your website quickly without compromising on quality? Then, a web hosting platform like Plesk is one of the best options to grow an enterprise website and maximize its potential.

PHP vs Node.js: Which is better?

Php vs Node.js

JavaScript has been around a long time and has always been at the forefront of making things happen. That is, on the front-end – handling everything browser-side. For back-end, doing the heavy server-side stuff, we used PHP. Even on some of the most popular websites worldwide. Meanwhile, Node.js has really overturned the old way of doing things. So now it’s PHP vs Node.js – who wins?

The story of Node.js and PHP

Many wonder why JavaScript was trapped in just front-end. It led to Node.js and the framework which allows JavaScript to not just run client-side, but everywhere. In this ideal world, developers could use a single language, both when programming client-side and server-side. In fact, Node.js has really taken off for a variety of reasons. And if you develop, you have an enormous amount of choices of platforms including the ultra-popular Angular JS.

PHP has also seen a huge amount of development with speed being one of the greatest benefits. At version 7, PHP has come a long way with JIT compiling a particularly popular feature of the later versions of PHP. Basically, PHP can now deliver just as quickly as Node.js and there’s also HHVM with hash which supports really cutting-edge programming techniques.

As always in technology, it’s not easy to decide what will lead the future. Sometimes there is a place for both competing technologies, sometimes it’s Betamax vs. VHS: only one will survive. But right now, we take a look at the situations where PHP serves you better, and point out the use cases where Node.js is a better choice.

Pro of PHP: Code and content together

As much as projects have different requirements for efficiency of code, logic and planning, it stays true that splitting the logic layer from the content layer is a wise choice. But do you want to spend time doing so? A PHP advantage is that it makes it easy to quickly add logic in the middle of HTML content. You can just trigger some logic by picking out a few markers in the URL, and tweak your content accordingly. Job done. And with some websites, that’s all you need.

Pro of Node.js: Everlasting power of MVC

A complex site with lots of logic snippet dispersed across pages can be difficult to manage. With Node.js you need to act in a more structured way (Model-View-Controller model). But with a complex application, structure is better for everyone. Node.js prompts you to lay code out in a way that is easy for you to maintain. And easy for a new project team member to understand. Yet, planning always takes time, and this structured approach might not be ideal under all scenarios.

PHP vs Node.js: Having variety against being up-to-date

Experienced programmers will know that an established code base is both a blessing and a curse. On the one hand, PHP provides you with a wide selection of libraries and frameworks, so you don’t have to write thousands of lines from scratch: almost every imaginable necessity has its implementation in code. However, this huge code base is not necessarily fresh or relevant. In the world of fast-moving web apps, this can be a liability.

Node.js, in contrast, offers a code base which is aware of the latest developments in web architecture. Though you may find fewer completed code chunks those which you do find will be more relevant. Besides, with Node.js you’ll find coding from fresh easy and quick because of its design. It fits into current development models, including the push for clients to do the heavy-lifting.

PHP vs Node.js: Simplicity but also flexibility

Though we’re currently on PHP 7.0, the initial purpose of PHP was simply to serve as a connector between HTTP requests and a server database. Considering how capable a database can be, this simple layer of basic functions and a couple of variables is often all that you needed. In fact, for a lot of use cases, all you need is that thin layer of PHP, and that’s it.

JavaScript, however, gives you more flexibility and the opportunity to pull in libraries by means of jQuery. It’s so powerful that you can shift functions around as if they were objects. Besides, Node.js is a modern language and despite some frustrating aspects also offer some really useful features, including the much-loved closures. So still PHP vs Node.js, but let’s keep going.

PHP vs Node.js: Growing code or multiple languages?

PHP code is expanding, but Node.js opens the doors to many languages. Many PHP developers have yearned to be able to do more with PHP than simply pull content from a database and present it in a tidy way. In a way their wish has been granted: you can now use HHVM (open-source virtual machine) to do much more than you could before, including the use of annotations and lambda expressions. Even if you are restricted to using HHVM for your code this is not so much of a problem as HHVM is actually very fast.

But why restrict yourself to HHVM when Node.js gives you what is literally dozens of options. With Node.js you can cross-compile so many languages that it really opens a world of opportunities. Whether you prefer C#, Lisp or other languages that could even include BASIC or, if you must, Pascal – there’s no arguing, you have choices. The fact that so many languages can be cross-compiled to run in Javascript is a huge advantage in many situations.

Client-side code using Node.js

Downside

It’s true that some websites don’t need to execute any code on the client side. They simply use PHP to generate HTML from a database and get done with it. This is especially important when pages are rendered by mobile phones with small brains. Because you don’t want a code-heavy client side that gets bogged down with a slow mobile processor. Besides, simple HTML is less likely to lead to glitches.

Upside

Yet there are advantages to keeping some of the workload on the client side. And Node.js is simply more efficient, especially in terms of server usage. You send less data over the internet because there is less HTML mark-up. And you don’t need to submit a huge chunk of HTML code every time a little bit of data changes. AJAX takes care of all of this. This way of coding is ultimately  useful if your website is very data-driven, and requires more interaction from the user.

Database Queries: Advantages for both PHP and Node.js

If you’re familiar with and love SQL, PHP could be the best option for you. PHP was built closely to MySQL and databases similar to it such as Percona or Drizzle. Besides, you can easily connect to other SQL database from Oracle or even MS. Simply by making some basic changes to the code you use. Because SQL and the SQL code is so universal, it makes it really easy to work with databases and PHP.

JSON is not a bad alternative, however, as this too has a wide spread of databases it is compatible with. If you’re thinking of non-SQL databases for your application JSON can turn out to be quite a good solution. Though you can match JSON with PHP too, the similarity between JSON and JavaScript makes it great in a JavaScript environment.

It’s all about speed – but which?

Often there is a trade-off between the speed of writing the code, and the speed of an application executing. This is definitely the case with PHP and Node.js, with PHP being incredibly quick to put together. With PHP you don’t need a compiler or any JAR files. And PHP is an excellent choice if you need a working project really quickly.

On the flipside, PHP code doesn’t execute that quickly. In contrast, Node.js is code that executes smoothly and quickly reducing the load requirement on your server. You also get access to callbacks, which wastes less time when you try to deal with multiple different threads. You’ll spend more time coding and compiling with Node.js. But your code will be more optimized in the end.

PHP and Node.js Ecosystems

Finally, one distinction between Node.js and PHP that is worth keeping in mind is this: Node.js has a single code base. While there was a split in Node.js a while back, the group behind it has, for the most part, stuck to its guns and provided developers with the consistency they need.

However, the ongoing activity around PHP has benefits. Competing spur frameworks and libraries of the different teams want to add more useful features and improve performance. Zend and HHVM are both excellent projects. But there is a risk that, in the long-run, you’ll end up developing code on a code base that is relegated to the ash heap.

PHP and NodeJS – Supported Technologies

Node.JS PHP
Content Management Systems Apostrophe2, PencilBlue, Enduro.Js, Ghost WordPress, Opencart, Drupal, Magento, Joomla, ModX
Model-View-Controller frameworks Express JS, Sails JS, Koa JS Zend, Laravel, CodeIgniter, CakePhp, Symfony
HTML templates Mustache, EJS, Jade, Embedded JS Smarty, Twig, Blade, Volt
QA Jasmine, Protractor, Casper JS, Phantom.JS PHPUnit, Dusk, Codeception, Selenium
Caching Redis, Node-Cache Memcache, Redis
Rest API Restify, Loopback RestClient, Guzzle
Horizontal Scaling Amazon Elastic Beanstalk Varnish, Amazon Elastic Beanstalk
Profiling Internal profiler XDebug, Blackfire, XHProf

What’s great for both Node.js and PHP?

Plesk Onyx Hosting Platform

We realize that there are advantages to both languages. So we offer you the ability to host code in both PHP and Node.js, with hosting features tailored to each. Let’s have a look.

Node.js

Node.js has really gained enormous popularity within a short period of time, and with good reason. JavaScript itself is so widely-used and well-understood, making it an excellent way to start building a new code base. Node.js is a great way to build lightning-fast web applications. We can help you run Node.js applications easily and with high speed, offering the following hosting capabilities:

  • You can add Node.js to an application by just a click or two.
  • Plesk lets you easily manage your live Node.js applications, including starting and stopping (or restarting) and also editing config files and installing NPM packages. Our Onyx hosting platform really offers it all.
  • Plesk Onyx for Linux also allows you to install different live versions of Node.js in the same instance, for additional flexibility.

Find out more about how Node.js works on Plesk Onyx

PHP

Plesk has always offered support for PHP. This reliable language has been around for a very long time and is the basic building block for millions of web applications. We offer a top PHP hosting solution, including the following features.

  • Onyx supports multiple PHP versions out of the box, just pick your preferred PHP version when you install.
  • Standard PHP handlers are automatically configured for you.
  • Alternatively, pick your choice of PHP version and handler, making available to your customers only the versions you choose.

Do you really need a control panel? Here’s what we think

Control Panel - Do You Need One?

Web hosting control panels have become wildly popular over the last years for the rich features they offer hosting users. These software solutions allow users easily manage their VPS and dedicated servers as well as shared accounts. And without deep knowledge of system administration too – which in turn simplifies various tasks. Many consider control panels to be absolutely essential, especially on Unix and Linux servers. Others, however, see them as a needless cost.

The Pros of a Control Panel

Control Panel Pros

Your server’s purpose will have a drastic effect on how useful a control panel is for you. If you provide hosting services, a graphical interface to manage websites is a service your clients will expect. However, if you have a single-function server, a free tool like phpMyAdmin might be the only thing you regularly use. Making a control panel unnecessary.

The Cost of a Control Panel

moneyicon2

If you’re considering a control panel, you probably know it may not be free. You’ll need an annual license for most control panels. Unless a web host integrates this extra service into your monthly costs of server leasing. Of course, free control panels do exist. However, the reliability and quality level of these products is in question. And they hardly can be compared to commercial control panels.

A Control Panel and Hosting Business

Control Panel In Hosting Business

For those who hold solid skills in server administration tasks, a control panel can just be an extra, unnecessary layer. There’s no real need for a control panel of any type. Don’t fix what isn’t broken, as they say.

However, if you run a hosting business and care about scalability, it’s a different matter. Having a control panel will likely make completing tasks simpler and more efficient. And therefore, it’ll be a worthwhile investment for yourself and your customers.

The Versatile Plesk Onyx Control Panel

The versatile Plesk Onyx control panel

Plesk is an ideal multi-OS control panel for four main groups: administrators, digital professionals, resellers and end-users. Making it an extremely versatile tool for almost any web host.

Administrators

Admins, including web professionals and hosting providers, enjoy the Plesk control panel for a couple of reasons. Firstly, it is a great tool for configuring services, so providers can use an all-in-one service instead of separately configuring a web or FTP server. After configuring, hosts can combine these services with server resources, such as disk space or traffic, to make hosting packages. These service plans could contain web applications like mail accounts and websites and be sold to clients.

Web Professionals

Such as web design agencies. They often buy VPS hosting that already has Plesk installed, or they add it on themselves. The benefits of this control panel for those in the web design industry include managing multiple aspects of their web presence and controlling service management operations.

More on VPS Control Panels here.

Web developers may use the Plesk control panel as a hosting platform to build websites, test them and show the results to clients. It gives control over their server backup and PHP settings – both important for a web administrator.

Resellers or Web Hosters

Another group that will appreciate the benefits of the Plesk control panel. Your business will resell HSP hosting services, using Plesk to purchase tons of resources. And then dividing them.

You can then sell the reduced packages to end-users with additional services. And you, as a reseller, will get to lower your expenses by allowing HSPs to perform server management.

End-Users

Even end-users benefit from access to a control panel. Through a host or reseller, customers can obtain a hosting plan and use Plesk to manage their various services.

Some of the features of the Plesk control panel for end-users include creating sites that they can then populate with their own website content and adding mail accounts.

So, is a hosting control panel actually for you?

Functionality is the main reason to think about it here. Will your server gain functionality with a control panel – and if so, what kind?

Consider if a control panel would save you time, whether it would make the server more attractive to potential clients, and if it could simplify regular tasks.

Get in touch with the button under here to find the right Plesk Onyx fit for you and your business. Or simply sign up for one of our free trials by clicking below. 

Cloud Hosting Platforms – Choose the right one for your business

Cloud Hosting Platforms - Choose the right one for your business

Cost is often the biggest factor in the minds of business leaders when it comes to picking a cloud hosting platform provider. But is it right to focus so heavily on price when value for your business needs is clearly the primary focus? For anyone looking to choose from the ‘big three’ cloud hosting platforms, it comes as no surprise that Google Cloud Platform (GCP), Amazon Web Services (AWS) and Microsoft Azure are the dominant horses in this race.

 

More about these Cloud Hyperscalers

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