Next Level Ops: Season 1 Recap

Hello Pleskians! As we approach our second season of Next Level Ops: The Official Plesk Podcast, we’re bringing you a Season 1 Recap while you get ready for more quality content. 

The podcast was created for you, Plesky reader (and listener), to give you industry insights and tips into the world of web hosting, development and management. 

So let your curiosity fly and learn through listening to these 10 curated episodes, hosted by podcast wiz Joe Casabona.

Episode 1 

20 Years of Evolution in Web Hosting

Kicking off our first ever episode of Next Level Ops, Joe meets Lukas Hertig, veteran Pleskian and fellow hosting enthusiast, to look back on 20 years of websites and hosting.

As they re-live the early years of websites and hosting (the ‘wild wild west’, in the words of Lukas), the interview unpacks the industry evolution from 2000 to today. From the first dynamic webs, to major disrupters like WordPress, the conversation ponders the growth of web hosting, and questions the future of hosting as-we-know-it. 

Looking for a trip down memory lane? Stream the episode here:

Lukas Hertig  

Lukas is the SVP Business Development & Strategic Alliances at Plesk.

Episode 2

Partnerships and High-Level Hosting Support

In this chapter, Joe interviews Pleskian Partner wizard, Francisco Pereira Carvalho, to delve into the global nature of today’s hosting market.

With more than 32 languages supported, serving 140 countries worldwide at Plesk, Francisco describes the essence of understanding what’s important for different cultures and regions. He explains that members of the Partner Program benefit from the intuitive and easy Plesk tool with the advantages of an international team.

Enticed yet? Stream the episode to find out more about the program here:

Francisco Pereira Carvalho  

Francisco is the Head of Sales at Plesk.

Episode 3

The Power of Extensions

If you’ve ever built a website, you’ve probably installed at least one or two extensions to enhance your web management. They provide extra tools and features to make your website run smoothly or to improve user experience.

In this episode of Next Level Ops, Joe talks to Jan Loeffler about Plesk’s extensions and kits that make users and admins love the Plesk experience. Some of the so-called ‘Lighthouse extensions’ – which are the most popular ones with users – are included as standard on Plesk. Others, like the SEO Toolkit, are available for download.

But what makes them so great? Let Jan and Joe tell you in Episode 3:

Jan Loeffler  

Jan is the Chief Technical Officer at Plesk.

Episode 4

How Not to Become a Security Engineer

For the fourth instalment of the series, Joe chats with security warlock Igor Antipkin about safeguarding websites. As he explains, the need to educate and be aware of potential threats is real. Web admins need to know the software they use, and share key insights with their own communities.

Alright, so now you’re getting worried. But have no fear, this episode explains how easy security can be with Plesk (and how to avoid dedicating your life to it):

Igor Antipkin  

Igor is a Security Engineer at Plesk. 

Episode 5

Finding the Right Managed Hosting for You

As WordPress continues to grow, traditional, service-free hosts could be left behind. This is what Andrey Kugaevskiy tells us in this episode of Next Level Ops, spelling out the benefits of Managed WordPress Hosting. 

In this month’s discussion with Joe, we learn how choosing a suitable WordPress host can be tricky, and you should keep WordPress-savvy people around if you’re not sure. Andrey suggests, for a smoother, easier and safer experience, take the option of host + management, any day.

Hear the full break-down of Managed WordPress options to make your life easier:

Andrey Kugaevskiy  

Andrey is a Senior Program Manager at Plesk.

Episode 6

Competing in a Hyperscale Cloud Environment

Welcoming back Lukas Hertig, episode 6 explores the world of cloud hosting, its applications in our everyday lives, and ‘hyperscaling’. In other words, companies like Netflix and Amazon that are scaling their operations thanks to shared services in the cloud.

More and more, hosting services opt for the cloud, with its flexibility and specialist managed services. So how do you compete in that environment? Are you thirsty to know how to benefit from the cloud, from experts?

Well then listen to this episode here:

Lukas Hertig  

Lukas is the SVP Business Development & Strategic Alliances at Plesk.

Episode 7

The Downtime Checklist and Web Scaling

Jan Loeffler, tech mage at Plesk, returns for this edition of Next Level Ops to discuss scalability and hosting. 

As you grow your online presence and traffic starts streaming in, Jan talks of the necessary steps for scaling. Have you considered how you’ll avoid downtime? Does your server have the capacity to grow? How long will customers have to wait for the page to load? Jan suggests a Downtime Checklist for scaling and optimization, but you’ll have to hear the full version in the episode here:

Jan Loeffler  

Jan is the Chief Technical Officer at Plesk.

Episode 8

Solving Common WordPress Problems

“The great and terrible thing about WordPress is the amount of freedom you have.” Guest-starring to discuss common issues with WordPress, product wizard Lucas Radke explains the value of a secure hosting environment. With so much margin for error, web builders, admin and users have to be proactive in preventing risks for their WordPress.

But hope is not lost. Click play to learn how powerful hosting and plugins make your life easier and avoid the most common WordPress mishaps:

Lucas Radke

Lucas is a Product Manager at Plesk

Episode 9

The World of Email Hosting Providers

Are you searching for the best email hosting provider, and don’t know where to start? Scratching your head about enterprise options? Then put on those headphones and tune in to this edition of the Plesk Official Podcast, where Joe speaks to Christian Mollekopf from Apheleia IT to clarify the features and pitfalls of email hosting.

You’ll learn about calendar options, self-hosting, spam control and more. Click play to get the full intel:

Christian Mollekopf

Christian is a Senior Software Engineer at Apheleia IT.

Episode 10

Toolkits and Tips for Web Development

For the final episode of this season of Next Level Ops, special guest Brian Richards, Creator of WPSessions, takes us listeners through the modern tools for everyday web developers

Besides imparting useful tips about coding, Brian provides a specific list of great web dev tools and learning resources, suitable for keeping any developer in-the-know. 

Intrigued? Get your coding fix by pressing the play button:

Brian Richards

Brian is the Creator of WPsessions and an independent web developer.

Did this series leave you wanting more? To make sure that you get your regular dose of tech podcasts, Season 2 is coming soon. Watch this space, or our Spotify and Apple Podcast channels to get the latest updates.

Get to Know our Season 1 Host:

Joe Casabona

Joe is a college-accredited course developer. He is the founder of Creator Courses.

Next Level Ops Podcast: Using Cloud Services for Your Hosting or Website with Lukas Hertig

Hello Pleskians! This week we’re back with the sixth episode of the Official Plesk Podcast: Next Level Ops. In this installment, Superhost Joe welcomes back Lukas Hertig, our Highest Order Pleskian, to have a chat about hyperscale cloud services.

In This Episode: Cloud-Washing, Competing in a Hyperscale Cloud Environment and Specializing Your Niche

What do we mean when we’re talking about cloud services? What is a hyperscale cloud provider? How can hosting companies compete in a hyperscale cloud environment? Joe and Lukas get the ball rolling on cloud computing in this week’s Next Level Ops. “Unfortunately, there is a lot of “cloud-washing” out there in the market,” says Lukas.

“If you want to use cloud services, it depends highly on your use case or your business. All the great stuff that we’re personally using today - Netflix, Uber, Shopify - is backed by cloud services.”

Lukas Hertig

The main idea behind cloud computing is that it lets you share resources. Amazon was the first to consider this idea when it wanted to scale its services back in the 2000s. Companies can now run their applications on top of technology infrastructure provided by Amazon Web Services. These days, cloud computing is available globally. And a few big competitors have entered the market. One of the biggest advantages cloud services provide is that you can keep your data and your services where your customers are.

That said, in what circumstances can a company use cloud services? “If you want to use cloud services, it depends highly on your use case or your business,” says Lukas. “All the great stuff that we’re personally using today – Netflix, Uber, Shopify – is backed by cloud services.”

Key Takeaways

  • Advantages of using cloud services. There has been concern among European companies about privacy in the cloud. However, today cloud providers are fully compliant with GDPR and local privacy regulations. This has made it easier for businesses to use such services. Using cloud services also depends on your use case. If you are a large enterprise, it allows you to spin up servers closest to your customers at the click of a button. When you are a start-up, it allows you to scale your services very fast.
  • Competing in a hyperscale cloud environment. Hyperscale cloud providers have made cloud infrastructure a commodity. So you need to find new ways to compete on a different layer, not just at the infrastructure level. For hosting companies that means moving from “generalist” to “specialist” managed services. Hosting companies should investigate what niche their customers belong to. This will enable them to provide more targeted technologies and services to their end users.
  • Partnering with hyperscale cloud providers. You can partner with companies like AWS and DigitalOcean using their partner programs and build on top of their hyperscale cloud. These companies are huge but they’re also human! It’s not all about competing but using existing services and building strategic relationships for growth.
  • Benefiting from hyperscale cloud technology. The rise of the platform plays a role here, i.e. look at platforms like Wix and Shopify who are actually using hyperscale cloud infrastructure to provide services to their users. Companies can develop more customized solutions using technology from hyperscalers. These solutions may not even be possible without hyperscaler technology!

…Alright Pleskians, it’s time to hit the play button if you want to hear the rest. If you’re interested in hearing more from Lukas, check out this episode. If you’re interested in knowing more about cloud service models, take a look at this guide. Remember you can find all episodes of the official Plesk Podcast here and here. And if you liked this episode, don’t forget to subscribe and leave a rating and review in Apple Podcast. We’ll be back soon with the next installment.

The Official Plesk Podcast: Next Level Ops Featuring

Joe Casabona

Joe is a college-accredited course developer. He is the founder of Creator Courses.

Lukas Hertig

Lukas is the SVP Business Development & Strategic Alliances at Plesk.

As always, remember to update your daily podcast playlist with Next Level Ops. And stay on the lookout for our next episode!

Interested in Multicloud Management? Read This

Multicloud Management

You may be familiar with Multicloud management since many are saying Multicloud is the future of IT. But what you should know is that we’re already living in a Multicloud world. This IBM study clearly shows that 85% of organizations are already using this approach and benefiting from multicloud advantages. However, despite its popularity, as much as 60% of businesses don’t have the tools and procedures for multicloud management.

This can be a major issue for an organization, particularly in how it can unintentionally introduce risk and slow progress of moving high priority workloads. Here, we’re going to explore some of these major Multicloud problems and challenges of the approach. We’ll also look at Multicloud advantages and Multicloud solutions. These can help businesses navigate multiple cloud environments whilst meeting their ever-increasing demands.

What’s a Multicloud Management Platform?

Multicloud Management Platform

Cloud computing has evolved since Google CEO Eric Schmidt introduced the term in an industry conference. Today, most organizations use cloud computing to support some aspect of their business. Multicloud storage has become so popular that many now use two, three, or more cloud providers to meet their objectives. This led to the birth of Multicloud Management and Multicloud advantages.

Multicloud is a cloud computing approach made up of two or more cloud environments. As we touched on above, it developed because there are organizations currently using cloud services from more than one provider. There are many reasons why businesses choose to use a Multicloud management platform – and cloud services from several providers.

Comparing Multicloud vs Single Cloud

Firstly, the main difference between multicloud vs single cloud is that it lets you access the best SaaS applications. And across multiple cloud environments too – Such as Amazon Web Services, Google Cloud Platform, and Microsoft Azure. Secondly, multicloud minimizes their dependency on any single cloud provider, resulting in decreased risk and increased performance.

Even more, now it’s most businesses who are using a multicloud management platform approach. So, it’s becoming increasingly important for those who wish to remain competitive and agile in such a fast-evolving landscape.

The Multicloud Technology

The growth of multicloud so far has relied very much on containers and Kubernetes technology. One of the main multicloud problems has always been running different cloud solutions in different software environments. That’s why businesses need to be able to build applications that can move across environments without causing issues with integration. This is where Multicloud technology comes in.

As they isolate the software from the underlying environment, containers are an ideal solution to these Multicloud problems. They essentially allow developers to build applications that can be deployed when and wherever they please.

To manage and deploy these containerized applications, “container-orchestration systems” such as Kubernetes have emerged. Kubernetes, described as a platform for automating the deployment, scaling, and operations of application containers across clusters of hosts, is one of the most widely-used, open-source container platforms out there.

An organization can be following a multicloud approach without having any solutions in place to support effective multicloud management. Multicloud management is therefore the ability to manage multiple clouds from a single, central environment. Such management solutions may be called multicloud technology or multicloud management platforms. They are increasingly common today and stand out when comparing multicloud vs single cloud.

Multicloud vs Hybrid Cloud: What’s the Difference?

They sound similar but there are some discrepancies between Multicloud vs hybrid cloud. Multicloud is about using multiple cloud services from more than one provider. Meanwhile, with hybrid cloud, an organization uses a combination of private and public clouds and on-premises services from the same provider. Therefore, the providers are key when distinguishing Multicloud vs hybrid cloud.

Moreover, many businesses have moved away from public cloud models toward a hybrid model. Doing so means they can manage their workload across multiple cloud environments. Especially because of the development of hybrid cloud architecture. However, since many businesses are now following a hybrid cloud approach, they’re using a combination of different public cloud providers. Therefore, they’re also in need of a dedicated, multicloud management solution.

A hybrid cloud and multicloud management platform approach can and often do co-exist. But as they are different approaches, they each have their individual risks and challenges and so must have their own dedicated management solutions.

The Streaming Giant with Multicloud Storage

Netflix - The Streaming Giant with Multicloud Storage

As a quick case study of the multicloud storage approach in action, we can turn to streaming giant Netflix. A business based on delivering video via the cloud, Netflix has been open about its model. It’s also been open about how its main cloud provider has long been Amazon Web Services (AWS). More recently, however, the company has begun working with another provider: Google Cloud.

The move was reportedly executed to take advantage of the competing provider’s unique functions, from disaster recovery to artificial intelligence. Although switching providers may threaten its long-term relationship with AWS, the multicloud benefits far outweigh the risks. And in this case, it’s Multicloud storage that comes on top. The open-source tool it developed for Multicloud storage is called Spinnaker, and it’s even supported by AWS, Google, and Microsoft.

Before Spinnaker, Netflix was famous for putting all its eggs in the AWS basket. By multi-sourcing its data storage, the company has reduced its dependency on one provider. Thus, minimizing the risks of outages that occur without multicloud storage, and improving its flexibility for sustained growth.

What Are the Multicloud Advantages?

Multicloud management clearly has many benefits. For many organizations, hitting that 99.9% availability and significantly decreasing latency are enough to convince them. But it can also give you a range of integrations that only work on specific clouds.

For instance, if you have sensitive data you don’t want in the public cloud but need to build integrations for it. You can build workloads on the private side that can take advantage of the private sensitive data. This all-around makes for a more efficient workflow and greater user experience.

Potential Multicloud Problems

Multicloud management isn’t all good news. Alongside the many benefits of working in a complex multicloud environment, come several challenges. IBM outline these three challenges as Rapid Application Innovation, Data Overload, and DevOps and Site Reliability Engineer (SRE) best practices.

  • Rapid Application Innovation: As businesses work more with hybrid and multicloud architecture, the volume and complexity of objects and metrics increases. The result is monitoring and securing all your operations becomes an increasingly difficult task.
  • Data Overload:New technology in big data and artificial intelligence afford businesses many advantages. But with only traditional management methods at their disposal, they often lack the management capabilities to safely handle the data and implement an effective data strategy.
  • DevOps and SRE Best Practices: Employing DevOpsand Site Reliability Engineer (SRE) best practices is becoming increasingly expected in organizations. Moving to a DevOps model, however, is difficult because it is not just about technology, but also making cultural and operational shifts with teams — particularly in learning new ways of working and the introduction of new roles.

When trying to address these challenges, businesses are typically stuck between choosing a management solution that provides speed or control. But not both. An effective multicloud management solution, therefore, allows businesses to strike a balance and achieve both.

“A Unified Approach Across Multiple Clouds”

A lot of the challenges of the multicloud approach are mitigated by choosing the right multicloud solutions. According to the IBM developer Sai Vennam, there are three areas in particular that an effective multicloud management solution needs to address. Together, these three areas or “pillars” form the basis of what can be a “unified approach across multiple clouds”.

  1. Automation:

It’s necessary to have a consistent and yet flexible way to deploy and manage applications. Multicloud solutions enable this by simplifying and automating application management. Plus, improving flexibility with features like multicloud backup, disaster recovery, and the ability to move workloads. Not to mention reducing costs thanks to intelligent data analysis.

  1. Visibility:

With so many clusters running in so many environments, it can be difficult to know what’s running where. A multicloud management solution enables businesses to know instantly what business application components are running where, as well as to be able to monitor the health of resources across multiple clouds, both public and private.

  1. Governance:

Increased use of cloud-native components should not also mean increased management costs and risk to your business. Yet DevOps teams have the difficult task of employing governance and security policies across multiple clouds. With a single unified dashboard, compliance policies can be pushed across multiple clusters with a single command, reducing both time, cost, and risk.

Getting the Multicloud Advantages

Multicloud management can be overwhelming. Each cloud-based service inevitably comes with its own tools and multicloud advantages. And so, when you use services across multiple providers, managing them is going to be nothing less than a complex and costly task.

As well as covering the three pillars of automation, visibility, and governance, multicloud solutions must be simple and efficient overall. New multicloud platforms, with central control panels and rapid access and delivery to multiple clouds, prove ideal. The multicloud solutions that companies have been waiting for.

What Are Cloud Service Providers?

Cloud Service Providers

Cloud service providers ( CSP ) is the name given to any of those companies that offer some component of cloud computing as a service. You know the ones? They all have initials that end in “aaS”. So, you’ll see infrastructure as a service (IaaS), software as a service (SaaS) or platform as a service (PaaS). Let’s take a look at what each one of these common acronyms means.

IaaS Providers

IaaS means that the cloud service provider owns and maintains all the hardware and software that the customer would normally have to buy and look after in their own data center. This means that the building that contains all the many boxes with their CPUs, memory, cooling, power supplies and all the rest of it live elsewhere, and the customer only needs to connect to use it.

The IaaS cloud service provider will also monitor everything, protecting it around the clock from cyber attackers, and providing other services like load balancing.

SaaS providers

SaaS gives the customer access to a number of business technologies like productivity solutions, customer relationship management (CRM) software and human resources management (HRM) software. The SaaS provider looks after it all, so again, the customer just dials in to use it.

Lots of software suppliers have made the move to cloud-based services now, so there’s often no need for customers to buy physical media from them.

PaaS providers

Platform as a service combines cloud infrastructure and services together, and it’s often used in software development. The difference compared to IaaS is that PaaS vendors will add  more of the application stack to the underlying infrastructure; things like operating systems and middleware.

Cloud providers can also be divided up according to whether they provide public, private or hybrid cloud services.

Common features and offerings

Cloud service providers typically allow users to purchase their offerings or subscribe on an ongoing basis.

Some cloud providers have tailored their products to the requirements of particular vertical markets. They’ve adapted their services in the cloud to meet the requirements of specific industries or they’ve customized them so that users can meet particular regulations. For example, a number of health-related cloud products are on the market and they allow healthcare providers to store, maintain and back up their users’ personal data.

Major cloud service providers

There are many cloud services providers out there, but it’s likely that you’ll only have heard of the really big ones: Amazon Web Services (AWS), Microsoft Azure and Google Cloud.

Amazon was first to become a major cloud provider in 2006 with Amazon Simple Storage Service (Amazon S3). Microsoft came along with its Azure platform and then Google with its Google Cloud Platform. The market has grown and now these three dominant companies jostle for the lead share in many different corners of it.

At the moment, they are all working on cloud-based services that make use of emerging technologies like machine learning, artificial intelligence (AI) and containerization. Major cloud providers beyond the top three include Apple, Citrix, IBM, Joyent, Rackspace and Salesforce.

How to choose a cloud service provider

Choosing a cloud service provider involves looking at a number of factors. Cost is the main one, and you will normally pay depending on what you use, but you should be aware that this isn’t the only type of payment model.

What it’s going to cost you is of course important, but you might also want to consider where the servers are actually located if they need to deal with sensitive information.

Reliability

Reliability is crucial for the same reason that security is: your data is being kept somewhere else, so your ceding control of it to someone else. Reliability means knowing that you can access it all the time, and if you can’t, then that can spell big trouble for your business.

It’s worth noting that many cloud storage providers will promise 99.9% uptime in their service-level agreements (SLAs), and they will also spell out what kind of compensation you stand to receive if they can’t meet their promised level of service provision.

This sounds reassuring, but you do take care to read the small print in SLAs because some providers won’t count down time if it doesn’t exceed 10 minutes. If that doesn’t sound like much to you, then great. Perhaps your business can stand that kind of outage. But 600 seconds could be an eternity of dead time that costs companies in the financial sector (for example) a fortune.

Security

Security is an equally important area, but without visiting their premises poking around, it’s often hard to know how secure a cloud service provider really is. One thing you can look for here is the blessing of recognized bodies which set minimum standards.

Organizations like the Cloud Security Alliance (CSA) will certify cloud providers that meet their requirements, so check whether your cloud provider is certified by them.

The CSA’s Trusted Cloud Initiative program is another scheme to look out for. It was set up to aid cloud service providers in developing secure and interoperable identity, access and compliance management configurations and practices that are recommended by the industry.

Announcement: SolusVM joins the Plesk family

SolusVM

Today we’re happily announcing a new member of the Plesk family: London-based SolusVM from OnApp. Thousands of service providers flock to use this virtual server management system that offers Infrastructure-as-a-Service hosting. And we believe this acquisition will boost Plesk’s offering in multiple ways. Read on to see how.

Who are SolusVM and OnApp?

SolusVM is a virtual private server (VPS) and IaaS (Infrastructure-as-a-Service) management system. It’s designed for cloud service providers, their resellers and end-customers. With a web-based and customizable UI to manage infrastructure, it integrates popular billing systems and supports several of the most widely used virtualization technologies. Learn more about SolusVM here.

OnApp provides software, services and expertise to help thousands of MSPs and telcos build and grow successful cloud services businesses. Their offerings include OnApp Cloud, OnApp for VMware, OnApp CDN, and the OnApp Federation. Find out more about OnApp here.

How will the SolusVM acquisition work?

Plesk is acquiring all SolusVM assets and will carry on its growth strategy. Thus, elevating it from a single server control panel to a future-proof cloud platform. We’ll provide both cloud service providers and web professionals a single pane of glass application that will become the future of WebOps. 

The SolusVM team, led by Phill Bandelow, will become an integral part of the growing Plesk R&D team. This acquisition will also propel forward development and innovation of the next version of SolusVM. 

 “We’re excited to join Plesk, and become part of a changing force in the hosting industry. SolusVM fits naturally into the growing Plesk portfolio, providing new and compelling opportunities for our customer base. They can now expect a faster pace of innovation while being able to access the WebOps services and automation that Plesk is known for.   

Phill Bandelow, SolusVM Team Lead.

Why is this good news for Plesk customers?

Because of this acquisition, our leading WebOps platform will now have a complete solution. It will allow total control over as many VPS accounts as your hardware and resources can support. Our services will also cover the complete spectrum of modern IaaS solutions. And finally, you can now access the widest portfolio of hosting solutions to run, automate and scale your apps, sites and businesses.

We’re very happy to have Solus Virtual Manager and their complete VPS management solution on board. SolusVM lets companies of any size manage virtual machines - from one central user interface, with security and ease. Firstly, makes it a breeze for service providers, resellers and end-users to provision, manage and sell virtual machines. Secondly, it’s the first choice for providing cloud-based infrastructure hosting, based on the most popular virtualization platforms, like Xen, KVM, and OpenVZ.

 Nils Hueneke, Plesk CEO

How does this positively impact Plesk partners?

Clients and partners will get the same excellent support, product development and relationships they had before. But now, we have combined skills, resources, products and services to provide a bigger, more complementary, end-to-end solution portfolio. Furthermore, we’ll help our clients leverage their IT investments in SolusVM, while adding the requirements to meet their business needs.

Join the conversation on Facebook and Twitter. Or drop us a comment below for questions, or just to tell us what you think!

How to migrate your services to a server managed by Plesk Panel

How to migrate your services to a server managed by Plesk Panel - Plesk

First published on Nov 13, 2017 – Updated on Feb 4, 2019

Nowadays, a server operating system might host some of the following services:

  • Web service and associated applications used by websites
  • Mail service
  • Database services
  • DNS service

Often there’s also an installed control panel software that helps to facilitate the deployment and management of these services. So migration of the data and services from one server to another one is, in this case, the process of transfer of the control panel data and content (such as websites, mail, databases, DNS zones) to the new server.

Disadvantages of manual backup/restore

Disadvantages of manual backup / restore - server migration to Plesk

Generally, the migration procedure backs up some data on the old server. Then, transfers the backup file to the new server and restores it there. For such a complex environment, the transfer of data to another server isn’t the easiest option. You can, of course, move all the data piece by piece using the native backup/restore tools for each server component and file copy. However, it often takes an unreasonable amount of work-time and manual operations.

The other disadvantage is that it’s not possible to make a seamless transition if the services on the old server are active. Some data will be lost in transfer staying on the old server or some services will be down during the transfer.

Migration to a server with Plesk

Let’s now suppose you have Plesk Onyx on the new server. In this case, it will be easier to transfer all the data (web/mail/databases/DNS/Control Panel data). Because Plesk provides a special tool, the Plesk Migrator Extension, which automates the process.

This is the migration tool that Plesk provides for migration to the latest, recommended Plesk Onyx versions. You install it via Plesk Panel like any other Plesk Extension and it has a handy user interface too.

There can be different reasons for migrating services and/or data from one server to another. Let’s go through the typical server migration scenarios and see how Plesk makes the whole process simple.

Moving your services to the Cloud with Plesk and our hyperscaler partners

Migration from another control panel/hosting environment to Plesk

Migration to the new Plesk and Operating System versions

Moving your services to the Cloud with Plesk

Moving your services to the Cloud - Server migration to Plesk

It’s become popular to move onto cloud services and scale your business. You can easily install Plesk on the most-loved cloud platforms, like:

And once you install Plesk, you can migrate to the cloud instance with Plesk from anywhere, in a standard way.

There will practically be no difference as it doesnt depend on where Plesk is installed (cloud instance, virtual container/ machine or a physical server). You always migrate to Plesk using the Plesk Migrator Extension (this is the number one tool for Plesk migration).

Migration from another control panel/hosting environment to Plesk

Migration from another control panel/hosting environment to Plesk - server migration

If you have any control Panel you would like to leave for Plesk – check out our list of supported Panels. We might already have implemented the support of migration from it.

Your Panel not on the list yet? No problem. Plesk has a dedicated migration assistance team who can prepare the scripts for migration or do a full, paid migration service for you, if needed. Do not hesitate to contact us so we can help you implement the migration method from your server environment to Plesk.

You can even do this from your Panel (one that is not yet supported) on your own, using our custom migration framework.

Migration to the new Plesk and Operating System versions

Migration to the New Plesk and OS systems - Server Migration to Plesk

Another common reason to migrate to a server managed by Plesk is to update the old Plesk version and/or Operating System. Please check the Plesk EOL policy. We recommend that you migrate to the latest Plesk version (Plesk Onyx, since 2017) on a supported operating system.

You can check what upgrade/migration options are available for your OS/Plesk version in the Migration Process Guide.

More common migration scenarios

  • Joining and migrating services from several Plesk servers, one by one, to a new, bigger, more powerful server.
  • Migrate part of Plesk subscriptions to a new server.
  • Shift to the Plesk Multi-Server product.
  • Moving data to a server in another datacenter.
  • Switch to a server with upgraded hardware.
  • Transfer from a physical server to a VM/container.

In any case, the Plesk migration process is the same – you always migrate to Plesk using the Plesk Migrator Extension on the target Plesk server.

Common questions around migration to Plesk

Common questions around server migration to Plesk

Usually, when the migration planning has started, the following questions appear.

  1. Which tool should I use to migrate?
  2. What should I configure/check/install on both servers?
  3. Are there any ports that need to be opened on the servers?
  4. Will be there any services downtime during migration?
  5. How do you sync outdated data on the old server during migration?
  6. How much disc space do both servers need for migration?
  7. Is it possible to keep IP address of the old server instead of changing the domains’ DNS records?

You can find the answers and more details about the migration process in the Migration Process Guide document.

In most cases, Plesk migrator will warn you about the problems which need to be solved when it does automated pre-checks. Also, it will warn about problems when it does automated post-checks on migrated objects. Based on the warnings you can always do required corrections and repeat the migration of the problem customers/mailboxes/websites/databases any time.

Typical Plesk migration steps

Typical Plesk server migration steps

A short overview of the migration steps (more in detail in the Migration Process Guide)

For steps 1 and 2:

  • Install Plesk on the destination server.
  • Install all 3rd party components/software that your services use on the source server.
  • Make sure to install all products licenses.
  • If you plan to migrate databases, make sure that you install and register database servers on the Plesk Panel. Do this in the destination server of the same or higher version than the source server.
  • Install all available PHP versions via Plesk Panel installer on the destination server.
  • For Windows – Install the latest .NET framework version on the server.
  • Then, you can just install the Plesk Migrator Extension on Plesk Panel in the destination server.
  • Start the migration to Plesk from there.
  • Follow the hints of the automated pre-check/post-check procedures.

For step 3 and 4:

This will not interrupt your services on the source server. It will merely copy data from the source server and will validate them on the destination server. It will warn you if something is missing or if you need to configure something.

When you are satisfied with the migration result, you can sync data in step 6 from the source server to update it and switch domains’ DNS (or move IP addresses) to complete the migration in step 7.