How to Set up a Successful Seasonal Marketing Campaign

The holiday season is almost here. And whatever your product, industry, or target market is, this is a great time to create a holiday marketing campaign. This is not only to show your existing customers your appreciation but to capture new leads and turn them into customers.

Since ‘tis the season to give and share, we’ve prepared this step-by-step guide to help you to create effective seasonal marketing campaigns. Let’s get started!

Step 1: Determine the goals of your campaign

Before you start working on your campaign you need to determine what you want to achieve and the outcomes of your campaign. 

Your campaign’s goal should be specific, measurable, and within a specific time-frame. It should be relevant to the audience and the services and products you’ll be focused on. 

Most probably the goal of your campaign would be to get as many sales as possible. However, don’t forget to make your seasonal campaign more personal. Share some festive mood and cheers to build customer relationships and raise brand awareness.

Step 2: Define your target audience

It’s very important to gather as much information as possible about the people you’re trying to reach. So, to be able to create a smart campaign plan with relevant content and promotions, try to answer the following question about your audience beforehand:

  • Which social media channels do my customers prefer? 
  • Are they using a specific device?
  • What’s the time that attracts the most engagement?

Make sure your campaign refers to all segments of your audience. That is, both new and existing customers. Otherwise, you might consider creating two different campaigns to keep all segments of your audience happy.

Here’s an extra tip: If you want to know more about buyer personas and how to create campaigns for specific personas of the hosting industry, we recommend you our free buyer personas template.

Step 3: Create an offer

One of the most important steps to create a campaign is to understand what products and services will fall under your campaign offer. Your offer should speak directly to the needs of your customers. Try to pick up the most relevant product and services for this purpose, which makes the most sense for your earlier chosen audience.

There are many different tactics when it comes to deciding on products and services that you should discount: products you should discount, the most important to be effective honest, and clear with your customers:  

  • Discount everything equally.
  • Generate exclusive offers on your best sellers.
  • Promote lesser-known or older products.
  • Bundle another product or service.

It’s also a good idea to check your competition. Find out what kind of offer they have, what includes, and what their positioning is. This information will help you to create the most unique offer and stand out from the competition.

Step 4: Create a landing page

Once your offer is ready, you should decide where on your website to place it. We suggest two ways: 

  • Place the discount banner directly on the product page.
  • Create a dedicated landing page – click here for extra tips on how to create a successful landing page.

Step 5: Communicate your promotion

Offer – checked. Landing page – rolling. It’s time to give your campaign the boost it needs. So, to communicate your offers, choose the right channels for potential customers. Unfortunately, not all marketing channels can apply to everyone. Especially those of the web hosting industry. That’s why you’ll need to consider some points:

  • Make sure you know how big your existing audience is.
  • Decide if your promotion is for an existing audience, to attract new customers or both. 
  • Keep clear your existing marketing channels.
  • Know the budget you are ready to spend.
  • Adapt your website to your offers.

And some traditional but very useful indeed channels:

Email Marketing

It’s more likely that you already have a list of customers who might be interested in your offer. Or a list of customers who already bought your products. Or of the ones who sign up for your blog. Well, once you review your database you can create a list of the specific group of customers to whom your offer is relevant. And don’t forget to check the GDPR allowance before sending the campaign.  

Blog 

Another way to make your offer visible and add some SEO benefits to your website is to create a relevant blog post. Don’t forget to include a visual CTA (call-to-action), which will redirect to your campaign landing page or to the page you place the offer.

Social Media 

Social media is a great tool to reach new audiences by using popular industry hashtags or to engage with your existing customers, your community. It’s very important to analyze which social media channels your existing customers prefer and where you can get new ones. When it comes to web hosting or software industries, we recommend Facebook, LinkedIn, and Twitter. 

The most effective way to join ongoing conversations in relevant Facebook and LinkedIn groups to offer up your products/services and talk about your new campaigns. Check here to find out more about social media tips for web hosters.

Step 6: Campaign metrics

The final, and probably the most important, step is monitoring your campaign’s behavior and engagement. It’s time to determine if we reach the goals that were set before we launched the campaign. Analyzing your campaign’s performance helps us to understand what works and what doesn’t, which tactics work better than others, and what to keep the same or change for the next time.

With that said, thank you for your attention and for reading this guide. You can drop us a line below if you’d like to share your experience with seasonal marketing campaigns with us. We wish you profitable campaigns 🙂

What is Grafana? A look at its most important features for effective monitoring

What is Grafana, and what is Grafana monitoring? When Torkel Ödegaard took the decision in 2013 to fork Kibana, it heralded the beginning of the Grafana project, turning its forebear into a graph-focused and time-series dashboard tool. Ödegaard’s intention and guiding principle in creating it was to realize a dashboard that was dedicated to clarifying data by removing distractions and being a user-friendly and elegant solution. He seems to have succeeded in achieving his aims because half a million active installations don’t lie. These days you can find Grafana dashboards everywhere. Even if you’re unfamiliar with them, you may have seen one recently if you’re a fan of watching SpaceX launches!

Grafana Features

Grafana monitoring is achieved using panels. The basic building block for visualization in Grafana is the panel, and that panel can contain a graph, a Singlestat, a table, a heatmap, and freetext, and it can also integrate with both proprietary and community-created plugins too (like a clock or world map, for instance). Users are free to customize the style and format of each panel, and they can drag, drop, and resize them as they wish to create the ultimate visualization to suit their needs.

So, a Dashboard is a collection of panels, each of which holds a set of variables (things like sensor name, application, and server). These panels are arranged in a grid on the Grafana dashboard, and the user can change the data being scrutinized by switching variables, and that could be data from two different servers, for instance. Although the flexibility to customize views is one of the strongest Grafana features, users can just as easily pick up one of many ready-made dashboards to handle different data types and sources. Grafana’s large community of users and contributors has already created lots of them.

Grafana monitoring can include annotations to show particular events across the panels. Adding an annotation is achieved by putting in a custom request to Elasticsearch. Doing so makes this show up on the graph as a vertical red line. Hovering over an annotation then gives you an event description and tags (for instance) so you can track when the server returns a 5xx error code or when there’s a system restart, for instance. This makes it particularly easy to investigate system behavior and to track particular events and their consequences in an application.

Grafana Dashboard and Custom Web Apps

Grafana Dashboard and Graylog

Graylog can be used for the storage and management of web app logs and the monitoring of their performance, not just in production but also during the development stage. Grafana monitoring expresses these logs visually, to make analyzing the system more straightforward. You could legitimately describe Grafana as a web application load and performance user interface as well as a visitor flow tool. Graylog and Grafana work well together but there was no special effort made to integrate them. Graylog stores all log data in Elasticsearch, one of Grafana’s data sources, so it was easy enough to use one of the Elasticsearch indexes to connect Grafana to Graylog.

Visualizing Web Application Metrics in Grafana Dashboard

Grafana isn’t interested in error notifications or pure text logs because its main job is visualizing the data in tables, charts, and graphs. The developers created a custom Django module to track data on each web/worker request and processed response, not just reporting whether it succeeded or failed, but also providing a set of general and project-specific structured fields, including:

  • app version
  • ID for each unique request
  • response time and status
  • error code (if applicable)
  • IP address the request was sent from
  • user details (username for registered user’s email address, role, permissions)
  • device details

Django pushes these custom-structured analytical records into Graylog, which stores them in a different stream. Although Graylog dashboards can visualize this kind of data natively, they aren’t as adept at examining Grafana’s, so Grafana was adapted to visualize this analytical data. It can track application performance and load in real-time as well as retrospectively.

Top Features of Grafana

Grafana Labs is the name of the company that was created to push for the adoption of Grafana and to turn the project into a viable business. Whether you’re new to the Grafana dashboard or not, there’s a chance you may not be aware of the features that have been added to it both by Grafana Labs and its enthusiastic community.

Let’s take a look at some of the best ones:

Dashboard templating

This is one Grafana feature that’s really useful. It allows users to create a dashboard setup to suit their every need. And these templates don’t come with hardcoded values, which means that if you have a test server and a production server, the same dashboard will work with both. Templating lets you examine data at every level from the macro to the micro, so you can start with a whole country, for example, then drill down to a particular region, and keep going as far as granularity allows. These dashboards are then shareable with everyone from teams throughout your organization to the whole community.

Provisioning

It may be easy enough to set up a single dashboard with some clicking, dragging, and dropping, but some users need even more simplicity in a way that scales. So, Grafana features provisioning so you can automate setup using a script. Anything can be scripted in Grafana. For instance, when you want to create a new Kubernetes cluster, you can have Grafana automatically help with a script that already has the right server, IP address, and data sources set up and locked. This is also a way to control lots of dashboards.

Annotations

This Grafana feature lets you mark graphs, which is particularly helpful if you need to correlate data when something misbehaves. You can control-click and type on a graph to create your annotations manually, or data can be fetched from any source to populate them. (You can see an example of this in the way that Wikimedia uses annotations on its public Grafana dashboard.) A good use case would be automatically creating annotations at the time of releases. If you were to start seeing errors a little while after a new release, you could go back to your annotations and check if the errors correlate. This kind of automation is possible with the Grafana HTTP API. Lots of Grafana’s biggest customers use it for a wide range of tasks, with a common one being to set up databases and add users. This is an alternative to provisioning for automation, and there’s more you can do with it. For instance, DigitalOcean’s team used the API to include a snapshot feature that helps them to review dashboards.

Kiosk mode and playlists

Playlists are great for ‘rolling coverage’. You select which Grafana dashboards you would like to display on a monitor or TV, and it can cycle through them throughout the day. Kiosk mode lets you only show the user interface elements that you need in view-only mode. Useful tip: The Grafana Kiosk utility handles logins, switching to kiosk mode, and opening a playlist, so if a TV you want to use has no keyboard you can still set it up without hassle.

Custom plugins

You can extend Grafana’s functionality with plugins that offer extra tools, visualizations, and more. Popular examples include Worldmap Panel (which superimposes data on a map), Zabbix (which integrates with Zabbix metrics), and Influx Admin Panel (which enables database creation or lets you add users). These are just a couple of examples and there are many others besides them. Write a little code and Grafana can visualize anything that produces a timestamp. Also, Grafana Enterprise customers can access additional plugins that facilitate integrations with Datadog, New Relic, Splunk, and others.

Alerting and alert hooks

Grafana alerts can be sent through several different notifiers, including email, PagerDuty,  or Slack or texts. If these don’t work for you, it’s easy enough to code alert hooks that create different notifiers.

Teams and permissions

Where an organization has one instance of Grafana and several teams, they usually like to have the option to enforce some dashboard segregation. It used to be the case that this wasn’t possible because Grafana automatically made everyone’s dashboards accessible to everyone else. The later edition of multi-tenant mode meant that users could switch organizations but couldn’t share dashboards. Some judicious hacks could enable both, so Grafana created an easier route to achieving this. It’s now possible to create a team of users and then assign permissions on folders,  Grafana dashboards, and so on, right down to the data source level for Grafana Enterprise users.

SQL data sources

Grafana natively supports SQL, which helps you to graph any kind of data that might be held in an SQL database. High-end users are doing lots of interesting things with SQL data sources, including building business dashboards that “make sense to your boss’s boss,” (as one team put it).

Monitoring your monitoring

If you take your monitoring seriously enough to want to monitor your monitoring, Grafana features its own Prometheus HTTP endpoint that can be scraped by Prometheus, making it fairly easy to get statistics and dashboards. Once the enterprise version is up and running you’ll be able to get Google Analytics-style data access, so you can find out just how much CPU your Grafana is chewing through or how much time alerting takes.

Authentication

Grafana supports LDAP and OA and other authentication styles, and lets you map users to organizations. With Grafana Enterprise, it’s also possible to map users to teams: so if your organization uses its own authentication system, Grafana lets you map teams in your in-house systems to teams in Grafana, which automatically gives team members access to their own designated Grafana dashboards.

Grafana on Plesk

Plesk provides Grafana integration using Grafana Extension, the premier open-source software for time-series analytics. Grafana can turn all kinds of data into all kinds of visually appealing graphs and dashboards that can be customized in endless ways.

You can use Grafana to:

  • visualize data pulled from default sources, which the Plesk team can integrate for you. The default source at present is the Advanced Monitoring extension, which gathers metrics on server health.

as a more experienced Grafana user, you can pull data from any source that will integrate with Grafana. If you’d like to do this, just give the appropriate permission to the Grafana administrator.

Hosting Control Panels of 2020 – The Definitive Guide

If you’re involved in managing servers for web hosting then you’ll appreciate the importance of having a simple, yet highly effective method of monitoring and looking after your hosting infrastructure. The most effective way of managing all the processes related to routine tasks of hosting infrastructure is to use a web hosting control panel.

Continue reading

Setting up Your Ideal Web Development Environment With Plesk Essentials

Morning beverage ready. Mail and calendar checked. Daily meeting with the team done – It’s time to start your engines and crack on with your project. If you’re familiar with this sequence, it’s because you’re also immersed in the web developer’s everyday routine.

Carrying out your daily tasks might be an easy-peasy chore. But when it comes to beginning a new project from scratch. And setting up your web development environment, you might need to add on a few more steps. Before starting cooking up a new project, you must have all the ingredients sorted. That is, for example, prepare all the data and tools you’ll need along the way.

And indeed, there’s a significant amount of web development tools out there. But what tools are suited to web developers? How do you decide which ones to have in your toolbox? In this article, we’ll bring you some prime extensions and toolkits that will make your web development experience even better. Let’s get ready to know some of Plesk’s essentials for web development, DNS, security, SEO, server, and backup.

Organizing Your Toolbox

At Plesk, our goal is to make web development simple and easy. And its integrated platform with full development and deployment capabilities allows you to build, secure, and run servers and websites. But if what you want to know is how to level up your skills with great tools, here are some excellent examples. Let’s dig deeper:

DNS, Security, and Web Plesk Extensions for Web Developers

Plesk DNSSEC

The DNSSEC acronym stands for Domain Name System Security Extensions. It’s a set of DNS protocol extensions that sign DNS data to secure the domain name resolving process.

The Plesk DNSSEC extension helps make the Internet safer. Let’s see what it allows you to do:

  • Configure the settings used for key generation and rollover.
  • Sign and unsign domain zones according to the DNSSEC specifications.
  • Receive notifications related to DNSSEC records and keys.
  • View and copy DS resource records and DNSKEY resource record sets.

Docker

Docker is a handy software technology that provides containers. That means an extra layer of abstraction and automation of operating-system-level virtualization. As a flexible Plesk tool, Docker can help you perform a wide variety of tasks. But that’s not everything. Docker also removes the obstacles to adapt to new technologies digitally as it uses existing technologies. This way, it acts as an assistant between different operating systems and developers.

The extension also frees applications from system infrastructure. Allowing expansion in capacity through collaboration. Here’s more of what you can achieve with Docker for Plesk:

  • On-demand access to a vast range of modern technologies.
  • Upload a custom image or choose one from a catalog.
  • Deploy and manage Docker containers straight from the Plesk interface.
  • Install Docker containers locally or to a remote node registered in Plesk.

Web Presence Builder

If you’re a beginner in web development, Web Presence Builder is the right tool for you. It doesn’t require great HTML knowledge or graphic design skills. This tool helps you create professional-looking websites not bad, huh?

Web Presence Builder also provides a simple visual editor and a broad set of templates for different websites. Pick a page design that you like and your content template. And then add your text to the pages and publish the website. Here’s what you can do with this tool:

  • Create web pages.
  • Add a wide variety of content (text, images, video, scripts, and more).
  • Edit website settings (website name, keywords, icons, and so on).

Joomla! Toolkit

Up next it’s the Joomla! Toolkit. A complete toolkit to power Joomla! websites. With this toolkit, you can mass-manage, secure, and automate all your instances, extensions, and templates running on a server managed by Plesk. All from one single entry point. Here’s more:

  • One single dashboard to control, maintain and monitor all your instances.
  • One-click installer to download, initialize, and configure Joomla! from start to finish.
  • It hardens your site against all types of cyberattacks with its robust security scanner.

Plesk WordPress Toolkit

As a developer, you’re probably craving lots of features and intelligent tools that make your daily workload easier to digest. Well, we’re proud to say that our beloved Plesk WordPress Toolkit is definitely one of them. With this toolkit, you can focus on core tasks and automate the mundane ones. And substantially increase productivity, security, and efficiency too.  

The Plesk WordPress Toolkit is by far the most complete tool for WordPress admins seeking pre-configured solutions for the best possible performance. As well as an intelligent tool that helps to always keep their WordPress sites secure and up-to-date without breaking a live site. In case you’re not falling yet, here’s why using this tool is not only a smart idea but also a rewarding experience: 

  • Manage all WordPress sites on the server simplifying admin tasks.
  • Install, activate, update, and remove plugins and themes from one single dashboard.
  • Keep the highest level of security selectively securing websites.
  • Clone and stage websites to simulate changes before going live. 
  • Synchronize the changes between files and databases of different sites.
  • Optimize SEO for higher traffic and manage WordPress search engine indexing.

Smart Updates

A great addition to the Plesk WordPress Toolkit is the Smart Updates feature. This power-tool combo automatically updates WordPress core, plugins, and themes using AI. Here’s more:

  • Smart Updates clones and simulates your WordPress updates before performing them.
  • It mitigates the risk of hacked sites by running updates in a secure staging environment without affecting production. 
  • You can activate Smart Updates in WordPress Toolkit with a switch, as well as automate update analysis email notifications.

SEO, Backup, Cloud, and Server Plesk Extensions for Web Developers

SEO Toolkit

Along with the performance, a thought-out SEO strategy is fundamental to improve your search engine rankings. And with better rankings, more visibility, traffic, and conversions. 

Organic search can become your primary source of clicks, traffic, and revenue for your business. With the SEO Toolkit, you get all the tools you need to give your customers a chance to find you online. And help them pick your website over those of your competitors. We’re listing some reasons why you should use SEO Toolkit for your website:

  • Track SEO KPIs and check your website’s Visibility Score to measure your success.
  • Site Audit analyzes your site and gives you tips on how to enhance optimization.
  • SEO Advisor provides you a to-do list to improve your performance based on your Site Audit and Visibility Score.
  • Log File Analyzer will crawl your site and pages to help search engines rank and index them accordingly.
  • Check each of your keyword’s performance and compare it directly to your competitors’.

Google PageSpeed Insights

As explained above, one of the main worries for web developers is site performance. Because after all the work you’ve put into your web development, you just want it to work smoothly and without any issues. But don’t panic – Here’s what you need to know to achieve good visibility in search engines. 

First of all, you need to create websites that are fast, useful to your visitors, optimized for all traffic, and most importantly, mobile-friendly. And secondly, you should monitor your sites with tools like Google PageSpeed Insights. It will help you analyze your website’s content and its performance to suggest specific improvements. Here’s how the PageSpeed Insights extension works:

  • Analyzes the performance of websites hosted on your Plesk server.
  • Assigns every website a desktop and mobile score depending on its performance.
  • Generates a report based on the results of the analysis and displays suggestions to optimize your websites’ performance.
  • Provides links in the extension UI to the suggested tools aimed at improving websites’ performance (for example, the mod_pagespeed Apache module).
  • Gives already compressed files to reduce the size of static files (free API key required).
  • Installs the mod_pagespeed Apache module and lets you configure it for your needs.

Plesk Cgroups Manager

Often, web developers suffer what’s known as the ‘noisy neighbor’ problem. For those who aren’t familiar with this concept, this issue occurs when a website on a shared hosting consumes all system resources and disrupts the performance of other websites.

To avoid this common problem, we recommend using the Plesk Cgroups Manager extension. This solution helps you deliver reliable and continuous availability. The Cgroups Manager lets you control the amount of CPU, RAM, and disk read/write bandwidth resources each subscriber or tier of subscribers gets. You can use Plesk Cgroups to:

  • Prevent consuming of resources of your server by some of the subscriptions on your shared environment.
  • Automatically set a limit of resource consumption, monitor it, and send email notifications when it exceeds a certain level.
  • Set limits at two levels – subscriber service plan level or subscriber level.

Backup to Cloud Pro

Last but not least, we find the Backup to Cloud Pro extension. This solution is for all web professionals that want to set up different backup schedules to the cloud effortlessly. What’s more, it allows you to focus on more exciting and innovative tasks as it automates your backup management. It’s easy to set up and you can secure your domains with Google Drive, Amazon S3, DropBox, DigitalOcean Spaces, and Microsoft OneDrive:

  • Back up the entire server, individual user accounts with websites or individual subscriptions.
  • Schedule backups.
  • Restore data from backup archives.

CyberDeals Sale – 50% Off Selected Plesk Extensions and Toolkits

Thank you for reading up to this point – As a reward, we want to share with you a sneak peek of what’s coming soon this November. From Friday 27th until Monday 30th, we’re giving 50% off all the extensions listed in the article as part of our CyberDeals sale. So if you don’t want to miss out on these unbeatable offers, stay on the lookout for new updates. And catch them before they fly! 

The Plesk WordPress Toolkit 5.1 Release – Backup Limits, Localization Support, and More

We’re proud to announce that the Plesk WordPress Toolkit v5.1 is now publicly available. So, let’s see what this release brings to the masses.

Discover the WordPress Toolkit 5.1

Backup Limits

Backup functionality was introduced back in WordPress Toolkit v4.10. And we have already received quite a lot of feedback about it. The most popular request was about limiting the number of available backups to prevent end-users from subtly eating up all their storage space. We’ve added the limit to Plesk Service Plans under the Resources tab:

The limit is enforced on a per-site basis for the whole subscription. So, each site on a subscription gets to create the allowed number of backups. If you set the limit to 0, the backup feature becomes unavailable to end-users. Which is handy for those admins who want to fully restrict access to the new backup feature.

cPanel changes

A month ago we released WordPress Toolkit for cPanel. And we’re striking the iron whilst it’s hot. That means we’re implementing a lot of changes specific to cPanel. Let’s quickly go through them:

Database User Management

The Database User Management feature was already available in Plesk before. Unfortunately, though, it didn’t fit into the WordPress Toolkit 5.0 schedule. Since we want WordPress Toolkit to be as identical as possible on both Plesk and cPanel, we’ve added this ability in WordPress Toolkit 5.1:

New Security Measure

The “Block directory browsing” security measure was missing in the initial release of WordPress Toolkit 4 for cPanel. This was due to certain technical issues we didn’t have the time to properly resolve back then. Now, we’ve fixed everything that needed fixing. So we’re introducing this security measure on cPanel:

Localization Support

WordPress Toolkit v5.1 now supports multiple different languages on cPanel. Whenever you change your language in WHM or cPanel, WordPress Toolkit will also switch to this language. This change affects both WHM (with server-wide locale setting) and cPanel (with user-specific language setting).

Changelog

WordPress Toolkit changelog isn’t the easiest thing to find, especially for cPanel customers. To remedy this, we’ve added the ability to view product changelog from the global WordPress Toolkit settings:

WordPress Toolkit has a single unified changelog for both Plesk and cPanel, since it’s the same product, just on different platforms. Filtering out information about the platform you need isn’t particularly easy. We’re looking into improving the changelog UI and UX in the future.

Improvements, Bugfixes, and Future Plans

Speaking of changelog, it clearly shows that WordPress Toolkit 5.1 includes more bugfixes than usual. But don’t worry – This is not caused by the sloppiness of the WordPress Toolkit dev team. We’re simply putting more focus on the stability and robustness of the product, which means fixing more bugs 🙂 

Besides improving site list performance on cPanel, we’re also planning to implement several internal enhancements. That hopefully will make WordPress Toolkit more stable and robust, leading to fewer bugs down the road. We’re also going to address a couple of other hot topics. Like adding sets for resellers by the end of 2020 – but we’ll get back to you with it when it’s fully developed. 

One of the upcoming WordPress Toolkit releases will focus heavily on addressing issues related to cloning, which should also improve Smart Updates’ performance.

…As you see, we have a lot of things in store for the future. So stay tuned for the upcoming WordPress Toolkit releases. And drop us a line in the comment section if you’d like to share your experience with us. Thank you for your attention and see you next time!

Why Do You Need PHP FastCGI Process Manager?

PHP-FPM (an acronym of FastCGI Process Manager) is a hugely-popular alternative PHP (Hypertext Processor) FastCGI implementation.

As you may or may not know, PHP is one of the biggest open-source software programming languages utilized online. It features heavily in web development across such well-known platforms as Drupal, Magento, and WordPress, and was originally devised to preprocess plain text in UTF-8.

When PHP was invented by Rasmus Lerdorf in the mid-’90s, it was one of the first languages capable of featuring within HTML coding with no need to call external files.

Lerdorf’s scripting language has continued to evolve over the decades since, and it’s now supported by any web platform or operating system. However, as PHP’s publication is under the PHP licence, it’s incompatible with GNU General Public License because of restrictions related to the PHP term.

PHP-FPM Key Features

PHP-FPM includes numerous features that can prove beneficial for websites receiving traffic in large volumes frequently. These are:

  • Ability to start workers using various uid/gid/chroot/environment and php.ini, which replaces the safe mode users may expect
  • In-depth management for simple stop/start processing
  • Logging of stdout and stderr
  • Emergency restart available, in the event of an opcode cache being destroyed accidentally
  • Support for uploads is faster
  • Based on php.ini configuration files
  • Slowlog variable configuration for detecting functions that take longer than usual to execute
  • FastCGI improvements, with a special function for stopping and downloading data while completing long processes (e.g. processing statistics)
  • Basic stats are available, similar to the mod-status module in Apache

PHP-FPM and Nginx

Nginx is the ideal combination with PHP-FPM. Why? Because it’s a stable web server recognized for its impressive performance and low resource-consumption.

It features an asynchronous structure that’s highly-scalable, according to events. On top of this, memory consumption performance is significantly better when using Nginx and PHP-FPM together.

PHP runs as an isolated service when you use PHP-FPM. Employing this PHP version as the language interpreter means requests will be processed via a TCP/IP socket, and the Nginx server handles HTTP requests only, while PHP-FPM interprets the PHP code. Taking advantage of two separate services is vital to become more efficient.

PHP-FPM and HHVM

Nobody uses HHVM (HipHop Virtual Machine) anymore, as it’s unavailable. This was an open-source virtual machine, based on the Just-in-Time (JIT) compiler, serving as a PHP and Hack execution engine.

HHVM executes PHP or Hack code in intermediate Bytecode HipHop code, through the use of the Just-in-Time compiler principle. This code is converted into machine code at a later point, before being optimized natively and, eventually, executed.

This is a stark contrast to the standard PHP interpreted execution: the Zend Engine converts PHP code into opcode, via the Zend Engine virtual CPU.

PHP’s last version, along with FPM, means the language’s performance is now the same — or even better — without needing to use HHVM. It’s compatible with the majority of PHP 7 functions.

Before PHP 7 arrived, the PHP HHVM processor (created by Facebook, available on GitHub with Zend and PHP licenses) was typically used.

PHP-FPM and WordPress

An Nginx server with PHP-FPM support is crucial if you operate an online newspaper, content platform, or WordPress site receiving a huge number of visits daily. This set up enables you to facilitate the execution of your WordPress CMS’s PHP code to a higher standard.

PHP-FPM and Magento

Magento, a popular ecommerce platform, integrates with Nginx and PHP-FPM well. If you want to achieve your online store’s top performance, you’ll need to use this web server along with PHP-FPM support. Balancer and caches are essential, too.

PHP-FPM is a very challenging topic for newcomers, but we hope this guide has shed light on it. You should feel more comfortable with PHP-FPM, its features, and everything else covered above now that you’ve read our expert insights!

PHP-FPM and Plesk

To insure high performance and low memory consumption for highly loaded web apps PHP-FPM handler is available under Plesk. You need to make sure that PHP-FPM is installed and the option “Process PHP by nginx” is on under Websites & Domains > YourDomain > Web Server Settings.

Conclusion

PHP-FPM is an efficient method on how to minimize the memory consumption and rise the performance for the websites with heavy traffic. It is significantly faster than traditional CGI-based methods in multi-user PHP environments. If your primary goal for hosting your web application is to achieve optimal performance and security, then PHP-FPM is the way forward.